Dean’s Research Scholars

Haskayne Research

The title of Dean’s Research Scholar is bestowed on Haskayne faculty members, except for holders of named Chairs and Professorships, who publish in Haskayne’s Eyes High (extended) journal list. Dean’s Research Scholars will be named for a period of one academic year (July 1 to June 30) following the year an article is accepted for publication in an Eyes High journal, or for a period of two academic years following the year an article is accepted for publication in an Eyes High Star journal. The title of Dean’s Research Scholar comes with two components: an individual award and an area award.

Alfred Lehar

Alfred Lehar

Lehar A, Song Y, Yuan L. (in press). Industry Structure and the Strategic Provision of Trade Credit by Upstream Firms. Review of Financial Studies. (Eyes High Star)

Providing trade credit can change how firms behave in the product market. For example, competing supply chains can use trade credit as a collusion mechanism. Competition authorities should watch how financing arrangements in supply chains can reduce competition and make consumers worse off. It can be better for competition if production firms do not engage in banking activities.

Duy Dao

Duy Dao

August T, Dao D, Kim K. (in press). Market Segmentation and Software Security: Pricing Patching Rights. Management Science. (Eyes High Star)

Duy’s paper addresses the patching approach to security in the software industry (consumers can decide whether to apply security updates or not). Producers can differentiate their products based on the provision of patching rights and how the pricing of these rights can segment the market that leads to both greater security and greater profitability.

Heechun Kim

Heechun Kim

Kim H, Wu J, Schuler DA, Hoskisson RE. (in press). Chinese Multinationals’ Fast Internationalization: Financial Performance Advantage in One Region, Disadvantage in Another. Journal of International Business Studies. (Eyes High Star). this study was featured in Harvard Business Review’s Idea Watch.

Top managers should consider together both the speed and geographic space of internationalization. They are advised to rapidly venture into and focus on intra-regional host countries, where they can utilize their home-grown firm-specific advantages, including technological and marketing resources. However, they should be cautious when rapidly expanding into inter-regional host countries, not only because they may have difficulty transferring home-grown firm-specific advantages successfully, but also because it is challenging to address large differences across inter-regional host countries

Hooman Hidaji

Hooman Hidaji

Gopal R, Hidaji H, Patterson R, Rolland E, Zhdanov D. (2018). How Much to Share with Third-Parties? Users’ Privacy Concerns and Website’s Dilemma. MIS Quarterly, 42(1), 143–164. (Eyes High Star)

Hooman’s paper shows that third-party content and services provide value and utility to website users; but this comes at the cost of user information being shared with the third party. This study analyzes publisher website decision-making in sharing user information with third parties, specifically focusing on the effect of user privacy concerns on the sharing behavior of the publisher.

Justin Weinhardt

Justin Weinhardt

Parke MR, Weinhardt JM, Brodsky A, Tangirala S, DeVoe SE. (2018). When Daily Planning Improves Employee Performance: The Importance of Planning Type, Engagement, and Interruptions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 103(3), 300–312. (Eyes High Star)

Justin’s first paper investigates if planning for a particular workday helps employees perform better than on other days they fail to plan. The authors analyze different planning methods employees can use to increase their daily motivation and performance.

Ogunfowora T, Weinhardt J, Hwang C. (in press). Abusive Supervision Differentiation and Employee Outcomes: The Roles of Envy, Resentment, and Insecure Group Attachment. Journal of Management. (Eyes High)

When managers habitually abuse some team members but not others, they inadvertently foster acrimony among team members, including feelings of envy and resentment towards the entire team (particularly in victims of the abuse). Organizations should explicitly discourage leaders from selectively abusing certain employees. Through training and other strategies such as publicizing and tying managerial performance and compensation systems to “no abuse” policies, organizations may dissuade managers of these deleterious behaviours. 

Liena Kano

Liena Kano

Coviello N, Kano L, Leisch P. (2017). Adapting the Uppsala model to a modern world: Macro-context and micro-foundations. Journal of International Business Studies, 48(9), 1151–1164. (Eyes High Star)

The Uppsala model is the dominant conceptual lens for studying the process of firm internationalization. Firms gradually intensify their activities in foreign markets, for example by starting in counties that are culturally or geographically close by.  Liena’s paper argues that the latest update of the model misses two critical dimensions: digital context as a defining macro-level feature, and the role of the individual decision-maker.

Kano L, Tsang EWK, Yeung HW. (2020). Global Value Chains: A review of a multi-disciplinary literature. Journal of International Business Studies, 51(4), 577–622. (Eyes High Star)

This article reviews the rapidly growing domain of global value chain (GVC) research by analyzing several highly cited conceptual frameworks, and then appraising GVC studies published in such disciplines as international business, general management, supply chain management, operations management, economic geography, regional and development studies, and international political economy. The authors develop an integrative conceptual framework for studying GVCs from an IB perspective, and suggest several future research topics.

Kano L, Ciravegna L, Rattalino F. (in press). The Family as a Platform for FSA Development: Enriching new internalization theory with insights from family firm research. Journal of International Business Studies. (Eyes High Star)

The authors show how family firm owners and managers can extract the most value from resources contributed by the family, and describe examples of family-owned multinationals that successfully capitalized on the family nature of their businesses to compete in international markets. The authors identify barriers that may prevent family-owned multinationals from successfully exploiting their idiosyncratic resources at home and abroad, and strategies employed by these firms to monitor for, and safeguard against, unique biases that may prevent successful internationalization.

Ciravegna L, Kano L, Rattalino F, Verbeke A. (2020). Corporate Diplomacy and Family Firm Longevity. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 44(1), 109–133. (Eyes High)

The authors discuss family firm longevity based on a new conceptual lens that is informed by transaction cost economics, and augmented with corporate diplomacy thinking. They propose that corporate diplomacy, through its three process steps—familiarization, acceptance, and engagement—can help the family firm augment its baseline reservoir of social capital, and allows improved economizing on contracting challenges that endanger its survival. Family firms that focus on corporate diplomacy processes and the resulting social capital creation greatly improve their chances of longevity.

Miguel Palacios

Miguel Palacios

Donangelo A, Gourio F, Kehrig M, Palacios M. (2019). The cross-section of labor leverage and equity returns. Journal of Financial Economics, 132(2), 497-518. (Eyes High Star)

Miguel’s paper shows that firms where labor takes a high share of revenues, operating profits are more sensitive to economic shocks and have higher expected returns. So labor leverage works the same way as financial leverage. Practitioners should take this into account in assessing firms’ riskiness.

Mohammad Keyhani

Mohammad Keyhani

Keyhani M. (2019). Computational Modeling of Entrepreneurship Grounded in Austrian Economics: Insights for strategic entrepreneurship and the opportunity debate. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 13(2), 221–240. (Eyes High)

This paper explores the implications of mixing two economic logics: one emphasizing entrepreneurship (based on the Austrian economics school), disequilibrium, imagination, and uncertainty, and the other emphasizing equilibrium, strategy, and sustainable competitive advantage. In the integrative view, even if a firm does not enjoy any competitive advantage over rivals, opportunities for profit or development of competitive advantage still exist through entrepreneurial action. Adopting this view in practice allows entrepreneurs to recognize their own agency, but also the limits to it and the role of external factors.

Oleksiy Osiyevskyy

Oleksiy Osiyevskyy

Shirokova G, Osiyevskyy O, Laskovaia A, MahdaviMazdeh H. (in press). Navigating the emerging market context: Performance implications of effectuation and causation for SMEs during adverse economic conditions in Russia. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal. (Eyes High)

Entrepreneurial actions can be based on one of two behavioural logics: causation (planning-based approach to achieve a desired outcome) or effectuation (leveraging existing resources to select from different possible outcomes). Causation leads to an improvement in firm performance, yet in adverse conditions, the shrinking benefits of this approach are outweighed by the simultaneous rise of associated risks. Effectuation is a costly and risky strategy in stable and prosperous times, yet becomes a preferred approach in times of crisis. In adverse contexts, a flexible effectual approach buffers the firm’s performance from the turbulence of the market environment. See video abstract.

Olga Petricevic

Olga Petricevic

Petricevic O, Teece DJ. (2019). The Structural Reshaping of Globalization: Implications for Strategic Sectors, Profiting from Innovation, and the Multinational Enterprise. Journal of International Business Studies, 50(9), 1487–1512. (Eyes High Star)

The authors study how multinational enterprises (MNEs) can continue to profit from innovations in the new global economic order, which can be described as having bifurcated governance at the macro-level and value chain decoupling at the micro-level. They examine the emerging constraints on MNEs imposed by a bifurcated world order and discuss how the dynamic capabilities framework can guide scholars and managers alike to achieve new forms of evolutionary fitness. 

Osman Alp

Osman Alp

Alp O, Sen A. (in press). Delegation of Stocking Decisions under Asymmetric Demand Information. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. (Eyes High)

Headquarters of retail store chains may not delegate inventory replenishment decisions to individual store managers, because managers’ self-interest may not yield the desired customer service level. Common practice is to rely on a centralized computer-aided ordering system (CAO); however, this neglects information about local demand structure and volume, and cannot keep track of lost sales. The authors show that a retail chain could realize significant savings if headquarters blended new key performance indicators into the performance storecards of store managers, and delegated replenishment decisions to more informed store representatives, rather than relying on CAO.

Tunde Ogunfowora

Tunde Ogunfowora

Ogunfowora T, Weinhardt J, Hwang C. (in press). Abusive Supervision Differentiation and Employee Outcomes: The Roles of Envy, Resentment, and Insecure Group Attachment. Journal of Management. (Eyes High)

When managers habitually abuse some team members but not others, they inadvertently foster acrimony among team members, including feelings of envy and resentment towards the entire team (particularly in victims of the abuse). Organizations should explicitly discourage leaders from selectively abusing certain employees. Through training and other strategies such as publicizing and tying managerial performance and compensation systems to “no abuse” policies, organizations may dissuade managers of these deleterious behaviours. 

Yrjo Koskinen

Yrjo Koskinen

Albuquerque R, Koskinen Y, Zhang C. (in press). Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Risk: Theory and Empirical Evidence. Management Science(Eyes High Star)

Yrjo's paper explores CSR expenditures as a product differentiation strategy. CSR increases customer loyalty and hence profit margins, reduces cyclicality of profits and lowers the cost of capital. The result is an increase in corporate valuation.

Outstanding Research Contributions

Outstanding Research Contribution awards are given to faculty who publish in Eyes High journals, but are not eligible for the Dean’s Research Scholar award because they hold named Chairs or Professorships. The Outstanding Research Contribution award comes with one component, an area award.

Alain Verbeke

Alain Verbeke

Ciravegna L, Kano L, Rattalino F, Verbeke A. (2020). Corporate Diplomacy and Family Firm Longevity. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 44(1), 109–133. (Eyes High)

The authors discuss family firm longevity based on a new conceptual lens that is informed by transaction cost economics, and augmented with corporate diplomacy thinking. They propose that corporate diplomacy, through its three process steps—familiarization, acceptance, and engagement—can help the family firm augment its baseline reservoir of social capital, and allows improved economizing on contracting challenges that endanger its survival. Family firms that focus on corporate diplomacy processes and the resulting social capital creation greatly improve their chances of longevity.

Eddleston KA, Banalieva ER, Verbeke A. (2020). The bribery paradox in transition economies and the enactment of ‘new normal’ business environments. Journal of Management Studies, 57(3), 597–625. (Eyes High)

Bribes bring an immediate benefit, but their longer-term consequences often make the situation worse because an environment is created where bribes are expected. Governments in transition economies should therefore prioritize the rooting out of bribery practices. In a family firm, the identity of the owners becomes intertwined with the behaviour and reputation of their firm. Once a family firm is known to be corrupt, the family name is equated with being willing to bribe, and this leads to a vicious cycle where bribes are expected without really helping to remove business obstacles in the big picture.

Anup Srivastava

Anup Srivastava

Srivastava A. (2019). Improving the Measures of Real Earnings Management. Review of Accounting Studies, 24, 1277–1316. (Eyes High)

Same-industry firms could differ in competitive strategy and use different amounts of intangibles in their business models. Thus, it is wrong to assume that same-industry firms have the same cost structures and that any deviations from industry peers represent a firm’s opportunistic or abnormal behaviour. If a firm displays different financial characteristics compared to its industry peers, that could well be a sign of the firm’s competitive strategy.

Barrie Nault

Barrie Nault

Guo L, Liu Y, Nault BR. (in press). Provisioning Interoperable Disaster Management Systems: Integrated, Unified, and Federated Approaches. MIS Quarterly. (Eyes High Star)

For disaster management systems, resource interoperability is key to districts sharing resources effectively; however, there can be tension between the technology fit for a given district and interoperability with other districts. Incentives can be used to motivate the collectively optimal interoperability approach.

Zhang D, Nault BR, Wei X. (2019). The Strategic Value of IT in Setting Productive Capacity. Information Systems Research, 30(4), 1124–1144. (Eyes High Star)

The authors study the way that information technology (IT) can contribute to a strategy of holding excess capacity. Using production theory-based empirical analyses, they find that increases in IT capital yield almost four-fold greater expansion in capacity than do increases in non-IT capital. Thus, IT capital is a more valuable constraint to relax than non-IT capital.

Koh B, Raghunathan S, Nault BR. (2020). An empirical examination of voluntary profiling: Privacy and quid pro quo. Decision Support Systems, 132, Article 113285. (Eyes High)

Customers with high privacy costs are unlikely to voluntarily disclose information. Monetary incentives, such as discount coupons to motivate customers to disclose information, work for younger customers only. Personalized services, such as specific product recommendations, are more valuable to older customers.

He J, Wang X, Vandenbosch M, Nault BR. (2020). Revealed preference in online reviews: Purchase verification in the tablet market. Decision Support Systems, 132, Article 113281. (Eyes High)

Reviews from consumers that purchased a product have a strong influence on future sales. Such verified purchase reviews matter more than the average review rating. Satisfying customers that already bought the product is critical to future sales.

Seok-Woo Kwon

Seok-Woo Kwon

Kwon SW, Rondi E, Levin DZ, De Massis A, Brass D. (2020). Network Brokerage: An integrative review and future research agenda. Journal of Management, 46(6), 1092–1120. (Eyes High)

This paper develops a comprehensive theoretical framework that organizes the brokerage literature. Using a theoretical framework, the authors review extant research within and across multiple research areas. They highlight the theoretical and empirical gaps that continue to plague the brokerage literature and suggest several future research directions for advancing the state of brokerage research, from theoretical, empirical, and practical standpoints.