OBHR Speaker Series

Organizational Behaviour and Human Resources

Upcoming Speaker Series

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Past Speaker Series

2020

Speaker: Laurie Barclay, PhD

Topic: Exploring the Emotional Landscape of Workplace Unfairness: New Insights and Theoretical Foundations

Abstract:

Emotions are a fundamental aspect of organizational life—they characterize our experiences, direct our focus, and guide our attitudinal and behavioral reactions. Despite the recognition that experiencing unfairness in the workplace is inherently emotional, scholarly attention on fairness issues has been dominated by a focus on the cognitive landscape of these experiences whereas emotions have been “underemphasized and underappreciated.” In this presentation, I highlight the pervasive and influential role of emotions within the context of fairness and how delving into this emotional landscape can open important new research avenues. Specifically, I focus on how emotions can guide important behavioral responses to (un)fairness, impact the value that employees place on fairness, influence recovery from unfairness, and facilitate and/or hinder leaders’ delivery of fairness.

Bio: 

Dr. Laurie Barclay is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management in the Lazaridis School of Business & Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research interests focus on fairness issues in the workplace, including how to facilitate recovery from unfair experiences, the role of emotions in experiences of injustice, and how to overcome the obstacles that can hinder managers and organizations from fostering fairness. Laurie’s publications have appeared in outlets such as the Academy of Management Annals, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Her research has received numerous awards, has been profiled in the media (e.g., Financial Times, NBC News), and supported by prestigious grants including the Ontario Early Researcher Award and multiple grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Laurie is also an enthusiastic teacher and mentor who has received multiple teaching awards, including the Alumni Award of Excellence for Mentoring. Laurie has also made extensive service contributions to the academic community. She is currently serving a second term as an Associate Editor at the Journal of Organizational Behavior and also serves on the editorial boards for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Organizational Psychology Review, and the Journal of Business & Psychology.

Speaker: Ernest O’Boyle, PhD

Topic: The ‘Goldilocks’ Zone: Why So Many Confidence Intervals in Tests of Mediation Just Exclude Zero

Abstract:

Emotions are a fundamental aspect of organizational life—they characterize our experiences, direct our focus, and guide our attitudinal and behavioral reactions. Despite the recognition that experiencing unfairness in the workplace is inherently emotional, scholarly attention on fairness issues has been dominated by a focus on the cognitive landscape of these experiences whereas emotions have been “underemphasized and underappreciated.” In this presentation, I highlight the pervasive and influential role of emotions within the context of fairness and how delving into this emotional landscape can open important new research avenues. Specifically, I focus on how emotions can guide important behavioral responses to (un)fairness, impact the value that employees place on fairness, influence recovery from unfairness, and facilitate and/or hinder leaders’ delivery of fairness.

Bio: 

Ernest H. O’Boyle earned his doctorate from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2010. He is an associate professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources and holds the Dale M. Coleman Chair of Management in the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. His research interests include individual differences, counterproductive work behavior, research methods, and ethical issues surrounding publication practices. His work has appeared in a number of leading outlets including Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Research Methods, and Personnel Psychology. He is the recipient of the Academy of Management Early Career Awards for the Research Methods Division and Human Resources Division. O’Boyle is an associate editor at Journal of Management and sits on the editorial boards of Personnel Psychology, Organization Research Methods, and Journal of Applied Psychology.

Speaker: Rachel Doern, PhD

Topic: Mentor/Schmentor: How chef-owners separate from mentors and redefine their relationships

Abstract:

This study investigates how chef-owners once working as culinary protégés in professional kitchens separate from their mentors and redefine their relationships to them. Based on interviews with 35 chef-owners in the UK, it examines the experiences of elite chefs as they leave mentors’ kitchens and open their own restaurant. Findings suggest that chef-owners separate and redefine their relationships to their mentors (Kram, 1983) differently, based on gender. Female chef-owners framed separation as a difficult process and expressed an “inclusionary rhetoric” during the redefinition phase, which maintained a continued symbolic connection to their mentors. Meanwhile, male chef-owners spoke of separation with greater ease and deployed a “distancing rhetoric” when redefining their relationships, which served to emphasize their independence and autonomy from prior mentors. These findings contribute to the literature on mentorship by revealing the complexities of the separation and redefinition phases between mentor and protégé and how these phases are expressed through gendered cultural narratives. Whereas women exercised the resonant trope “I wouldn’t be where I am today” without their mentor, men spoke of the importance of “tough love” mentorship. Our research has implications for the mentor-protégé relationships common to craft work and the gendered form they take.

Bio: 

Much of Rachel’s research examines the cognitions, emotions and behaviours of entrepreneurs in adverse conditions. Her research is inter-disciplinary in nature, drawing on different micro-sociological and psychological approaches to understanding entrepreneurship. Previous work has looked at resilience and vulnerability in an entrepreneurial context and how entrepreneurs interact with different stakeholders as they develop their businesses, particularly during times of crisis. Her recent research projects look at entrepreneurial diversity, different entrepreneurial identities and communities. In the latter case, her research talk will focus on the craft-based culinary world and the experiences of elite chefs as they leave the professional kitchens where they trained to create their own restaurants, becoming chef-owners.

Speaker: David A. Jones, PhD.

Topic: Do all Roads Lead to Rome? A Two-Study Investigation of Employee Responses to Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility through Identity- and Exchange-based Processes

Abstract:

A recent flurry of research on employee responses to corporate social responsibility (CSR) has documented several relationships between employees’ perceptions of CSR and various job attitudes and performance behaviors.  The exponential growth of work in this area, however, has produced a fragmented literature that begs for systematic testing of theoretically-grounded processes through which responses to perceived CSR unfold (Gond et al., 2017), rather than continued testing of conceptually-related mediators that are almost always examined in isolation from other underlying mechanisms (Jones, 2019; Jones & Rupp, 2018).  In particular, De Roeck and Maon (2018) urged researchers to assess multiple mechanisms derived from both foundational theories that have informed much of the scholarly research on employee responses to CSR: social exchange (Cropanzano et al., 2017) and social identity (Ashforth et al., 2008).

We tested novel hypotheses about the unique indirect effects of perceived CSR on employee outcomes through identity-based mediators (i.e., two mediational chains reflecting self-enhancement and self-consistency motives that link perceived CSR to organizational identification), while accounting for effects through an exchange-based mediator (i.e., organizational trust).  In Study 1, we collected cross-sectional survey data from employees of a single company (N = 177), and tested hypotheses via a path model.  In Study 2, we collected longitudinal survey data from employees of multiple companies (N = 484), and tested hypothesis via a structural equation model using measures of perceived CSR at Time 1, four mediators at Time 2, and two employee outcomes at Time 3.

Results from both studies showed the same pattern of significant paths and unique indirect effects.  As hypothesized, perceived CSR had unique indirect effects on organizational identification via perceptions of value fit, and through either organizational pride (Study 1) or prestige (Study 2).  On the two employee outcomes, the pattern of indirect effects was remarkably consistent with what we speculated through research questions in Study 1, and tested as hypotheses in Study 2:  Support for hypothesized indirect effects transmitted through identity-based mediators was only found on organizational citizenship behavior, and support for hypothesized effects through the exchange-based mediator (trust) was only found on turnover intentions.  Implications for future research and managerial practice follow from these findings.

Bio:

David A. Jones is the John L. Beckley Professor of Management at the Grossman School of Business, University of Vermont, where he served from 2015 to 2019 as Director of The Sustainable Innovation MBA—the #1 ranked “Green MBA” in the U.S. for three consecutive years (Princeton Review, 2018-2020).  Since completing his PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at The University of Calgary in 2004, David has been a passionate educator and scholar who is a recognized thought leader in the areas of employee and job seekers responses to socially and environmentally sustainable business practices. Professor Jones has published his research in leading academic journals, including Academy of Management Journal and Journal of Applied Psychology. He has served on the editorial boards of five peer-reviewed journals, including two in which he has also published his work: The Journal of Management where he currently serves on the editorial board, and the Journal of Organizational Behavior where he currently serves as an Associate Editor.

2019

Speaker: Erica Carleton

Topic:   Indirect effects of obstructive sleep apnea on work withdrawal: A quasi-experimental treatment outcome study

Abstract:

The effect of sleep on work is now receiving appropriate research attention, yet most results have been based on community (i.e., non-clinical) populations. Based on prior findings that clinical treatment for diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea benefits sleep quality, we hypothesized that sleep quality would mediate the effects of such treatment on work withdrawal behaviors (emotional exhaustion, cognitive exhaustion, work neglect and partial absenteeism). 125 adults with potential sleep apnea, who were referred to a mid-sized hospital$B!G(Js sleep laboratory, participated in this three-wave (pretest, posttest one month following initial treatment, and a follow-up three months later), quasi-experimental study. Clinical assessment using pretest data resulted in 83 participants being diagnosed with sleep apnea and receiving treatment (i.e., continuous positive airway pressure n = 62; or positional therapy, n = 21); 42 patients who were not diagnosed with sleep apnea comprised the control group. Consistent with our hypotheses, treatment positively affected sleep quality, indirectly decreasing emotional exhaustion, cognitive exhaustion, and partial absenteeism (but not work neglect). We discuss the implications of these findings for future research on sleep and its work-related consequences, and organizational practice.

Bio: 

Dr. Carleton's research interests include two separate but often overlapping research passions, namely (1) leadership and (2) employee health and well-being. She is fascinated by leadership behaviors and what predicts high and low quality leadership. Her interest in employee well-being has led her to investigate the non-work antecedents of well-being, especially different physiological and psychological predictors, such as sleep. She conducted her dissertation research on sleep, well-being and leadership. She is a co-editor (with Julian Barling, Christopher Barnes and David Wagner) of the book Sleep and Work: Research Insights for the Workplace (Oxford University Press, 2016). Prior to joining the Edwards School of Business in July of 2016, she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Ian O. Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership in Ivey Business School at Western University. While there, she conducted research on the validation and outcomes of leader character. She completed her PhD in Organizational Behavior at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University.

Speaker: Ann-Frances Cameron

Topic: Multicommunicating during team meetings and its effect on team functioning

Abstract:

Team meetings are a ubiquitous and important, yet costly, workplace tool. However, increases in time spent in meetings, the availability of mobile communication technologies, and expectations of constant connectivity have led to one behavior that may be reducing the effectiveness of meetings: Meeting multicommunicating (Meeting MC). Meeting MC is defined as being simultaneously engaged in an organizational meeting and one or more technology-mediated secondary conversations. Examples include checking or sending emails and texts, and many employees report frequently engaging in this type of multitasking during workplace meetings. This behavior is a complex type of multitasking and thus may suffer from the task performance detriments associated with juggling multiple tasks. While Meeting MC can be useful for accessing information needed for the meeting, in certain situations it can also increase perceptions of incivility and reduce meeting effectiveness. Individual-level effects of Meeting MC may also spill over and affect team-level functioning and performance. The key challenge is determining how to use Meeting MC to enhance team functioning and performance during the meeting while mitigating its negative effects. A program of research will be presented which examines the effects of Meeting MC on outcomes including (i) perceptions of incivility, (ii) deception detection accuracy, and (iii) team adaptability.

Bio:

Ann-Frances Cameron is an associate professor of Information Technology (IT) at HEC Montréal and is the holder of the HEC Professorship in Information Technology and Multitasking. She received a PhD from the Queen’s School of Business at Queen’s University. She is credited with over 30 publications—scientific and professional articles, book chapters, and papers in conference proceedings. Of these, several have been published in high quality journals such as Organization Science, Information Systems Research, Journal of Small Business Management, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, and Accident Analysis & Prevention.  Since 2012, Professor Cameron has been the director of the Research Group in Information Systems (GReSI), which brings together 25 researchers from Quebec institutions including HEC Montréal, McGill, Concordia, Université du Québec à Montréal, and TELUQ. She is also an active member of the Tech3Lab, a multidisciplinary laboratory that uses neuroscience tools to examine the interactions between technologies used by organizations and their employees and customers. She additionally has been a visiting scholar and adjunct assistant professor at the Smith School of Business at Queens University, and is involved as an instructor for NextAI Montréal, an accelerator for early or idea stage AI-enabled start-ups.  Her main research interests include the use and impact of emerging technologies for inter- and intra-organizational communication, including how these technologies influence individual task performance, team communication, and inter-organizational partnerships. She is keenly interested in how these emerging technologies give rise to workplace multitasking and its impacts.

Speaker: Tom Lawrence

Topic: Talking about work: theories of agency and social construction in organizational life

Abstract:

Although there have emerged a wide range of literatures that examine how actors socially construct aspects of organizational life, such as emotions, identities, and practices, these literatures have tended to treat those forms of work as isolated forms of action. In this talk, I explore some of the implications of examining theories of social construction in organizational life as a broad family of ideas with essential commonalities as well as important differences. In particular, I show that isolated theories of social construction have failed to account for the deeply “situated” nature of social construction, and the impacts of social construction on individual and organizational “performance”. The presentation is based on a forthcoming book, Constructing organizational life: How social-symbolic work shapes selves, organizations, and institutions (Thomas Lawrence and Nelson Phillips, Oxford University Press, 2019).

Bio:

Tom is a Professor of Strategy at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, UK. His areas of expertise include strategic management, organizational change, social innovation, institutional theory, and social change. This work has appeared in the leading organization and strategy journals, including Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, Organization Studies, Journal of Management Studies, Human Relations, and Journal of Management. He is also a co-editor of the Sage Handbook of Organization Studies and the Sage Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism. Before joining Saïd Business School, Tom was the W. J. VanDusen Professor of Management at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, and has held permanent or visiting positions at the University of Victoria, University of British Columbia, Cambridge University, McGill University, St. Andrews University, and Chulalongkorn University. He received his PhD in organisational analysis and BComm in finance from the University of Alberta.

Speaker: David Day

Topic: Identity-based perspectives on the leadership journey

Abstract:

The role of the self in the development of leaders is explored across several perspectives. An overview will be first provided of the focus, mission, and principles of the Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College (USA) as a frame for ongoing work on leader development. Research to be discussed includes the role of leader identity in the context of personal trajectories of development of high-potential corporate executives. Another project examines the effects of parenting orientation on self-efficacy, self-esteem, and leader emergence in adolescent youth. An overarching goal is to extend and further develop a lifespan approach to understanding leader development and the supporting role of self-views in that process.

Bio:

David V. Day is Professor of Psychology and Academic Director of the Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College. He also holds the titles of Steven L. Eggert ‘82 P’15 Professor of Leadership and George R. Roberts Research Fellow at the College. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society, International Association of Applied Psychology, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Day has published more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, books, and book chapters, many pertaining to the core topics of leadership and leadership development. He serves on numerous editorial boards and as the editor of The Leadership Quarterly Yearly Review. His article titled “Leadership Development: A Review in Context” received the 2010 Decennial Influential Article Award as the most influential article published in The Leadership Quarterly in 2000. He also was awarded the Walter F. Ulmer Research Award from the Center for Creative Leadership in 2010 for outstanding, career-long contributions to applied leadership research.

Speaker: Denise M. Rousseau, PhD

Topic: Researching and Teaching Evidence-Based Management

Abstract:

The trend toward evidence-based practice in policy and management challenges conventions of both how we study organizations and teach management. Its central tenet is that decisions should be made using best available evidence from multiple sources, vetted for quality. I will detail ways that taking up evidence-based practices changes the key tasks of management educators and its implications for management scholarship.

Bio:

Denise M. Rousseau is the H.J. Heinz II University Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy and the Tepper School of Business. Her research focuses upon the impact workers have on the employment relationship and the firms that employ them. Recognized in particular for developing the theory of the psychological contract, her work addresses the powerful reach individual employee's understanding of the employment relationship has on work groups, firms, and society. Her publications include over a dozen books and 200 articles and monographs in top management and psychology journals, all cited over 72,000 times (Google Scholar). She is the two-time winner of the Academy of Management's George Terry Award for best management books (I-Deals, 2006; Psychological Contracts, 1996), received the 2009 Lifetime Career Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management, and in 2013 received an honorary doctorate from the Athens University of Economics and Business. She was the 2004-2005 President of the Academy of Management and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Organizational Behavior from 1998-2007.

Speaker: D. Lance Ferris, PhD

Topic: Publishing 101: Tips and Tricks for Crafting Contributions and Responding to Reviewers

Abstract:

Publishing in academic journals can seem daunting. Particularly for new PhD students, sitting down to write a 30-40 page paper can be confusing without guidance on where or even how to start. And to make matters worse, after months of effort, your cherished final manuscript can then be met with a firm “reject” from journals. My talk describes tips and tricks intended to make this writing process easier and, ideally, more likely to lead to a publishable paper. In particular, I will cover a “fill-in-the-blanks” article structure used by most management journals that, once known, simplifies the writing process considerably. I will then cover some of the more effective ways to fill in those blanks (i.e., how to frame the contributions of your article), as well as general approaches for dealing with reviewer comments (including but not limited to cursing out reviewers).

Bio:

Lance Ferris is an Associate Professor in the Department of Management at the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. Prior to joining Broad, Lance was an Assistant Professor at the Lee Kong Chian School of Business at Singapore Management University from 2008-2011, and an Associate Professor at the Smeal College of Business at the Pennsylvania State University from 2011-2017. He currently serves on the editorial board of Academy of Management Journal and Journal of Applied Psychology. His work has been published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Organization Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology. He likes nothing better than to write short biographies about himself in the third person, where no one can stop him from writing whatever he wants, no matter how absurd. Most Marvel films are based on his life story.

Speaker: Lisa Bäulke, MSc

Topic: Making Massive Meta-Analyses Marvelously Manageable

Abstract:

Thinking about a meta-analysis? An order of magnitude increase in coding speed is what we are providing, shaving months off your time to publication. With over a hundred active users already, HubMeta is a new platform that brings the field more fully into the modern age, using automated and cloud-based processes, specifically: built-in analysis, easy export functions, automated data extraction, and taxonomic features. HubMeta is free (and always will be) so you can try it out now (https://www.hubmeta.com). Lisa Bäulke, Hadi Fariborzi, and Piers Steel will demonstrate how we are using the platform to tackle one of the largest meta-analyses ever attempted, as well as preview upcoming new features. Our goal is to inspire people to collaborate and tackle meta-analyses of previous unreachable scope with just weeks or a few months of effort, so perfect for those aiming for a top tier.

Bio:

Lisa Bäulke is a doctoral student in the Department of Psychology at Augsburg University, studying under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Markus Dresel. Within this role, she is also an active member of the Empirical Education Research Program of the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Previously, she completed her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Psychology at Ulm University. Lisa is a primary investigator in the “ProkRASt” research project, which is focused on better understanding academic procrastination as a risk factor for study dropout. Her main research interests consist of self-regulated learning in higher education (with a focus on academic procrastination and motivation) and motivational regulation in educational settings.

Speaker: Jeffrey Vancouver, PhD

Topic: Won’t get fooled again: The Roles of Statistics and Theory in the Practice of Safety

Abstract and Bio: Not available

2018

Speaker: Tara Reich

Title: Making sense of witnessed mistreatment at work

Abstract:

Workplace mistreatment regularly occurs in the presence of others and how others make sense of the mistreatment is likely to influence their responses. In the current set of studies, we draw on research on perspective-taking to consider how this behavior, a form of interpersonal sensemaking, influences observer attributions and empathy for each of the perpetrator and target, as well as their reactions toward each. Across three studies, we find that instructions to perspective-take primarily influence observer reactions toward perpetrators. Moreover, we find that the positive interpersonal effects of perspective-taking can be explained by the attributions observers make and empathy observers experience for the individual whose perspective is taken. Although observers seem generally inclined to take the perspective of and react positively toward the target, our results also suggest at conditions under which observers may react negatively toward the target or positively toward the perpetrator. We also find evidence to suggest that observer gender, and by extension power, may influence observer reactions. Limitations, future directions, and implications for theory and practice will be discussed.

Bio

Dr Tara Reich received her BA (Hons) in Psychology from the University of Western Ontario and her MA in Social Psychology and her PhD in Organizational Behaviour from the University of Manitoba. Dr Reich has published her work in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, the Journal of Organizational Behaviour, and Work & Stress. Dr Reich's research interests are broadly in the area of employee well-being, with a specific focus on the psychology of workplace mistreatment. Her research investigates how observers are influenced by witnessing mistreatment in the workplace as well as the consequences of observers’ reactions for targets and perpetrators.

Speaker: Elizabeth Campbell

Title: Hidden Predictors of Bosses’ Bad Behavior: An Expanded Model of Performance and Abusive Supervision

Abstract:

This research seeks to clarify and more comprehensively explain how job performance of the target and the perpetrator precipitate an expensive and destructive workplace phenomenon: abusive supervision. We offer theoretical account for why both low and high performing subordinates are more likely to experience abusive supervision and why both low and high performing supervisors are more likely to engage in abusive supervision. Adopting the social interactionist view of aggression, we explain why the impact of subordinate and supervisor performance on abusive supervision can be better explained with curvilinear relationships (U-shaped). We also consider how subordinate-supervisor performance dissimilarity and supervisor threat sensitivity strengthen these U-shaped relationships. Results from an experiment of 176 business school students offered initial support and established causal main effects. Then, findings from a multisource field study of 422 supervisor-subordinate dyads offered support of our broader predictions: low and high performing subordinates faced more abuse than average performers, while low and high performing supervisors were more abusive than their average performing counterparts. We discuss the implications of these results for theory and practice.

Speaker: Sabine Sonnentag

Title: Can Work Support a Healthy Lifestyle? Organizational Climate, Healthy Eating, and Physical Exercise  

Abstract:

In this presentation I shall discuss how experiences in organisational life are linked to individual health behavior, particularly eating behavior and physical exercise. I shall focus on job stress as a factor that potentially compromises health behavior, and organisational climate that can encourage health behavior.

I shall introduce the concept of Organizational Health Behavior Climate (OHBC) and present a measure that captures values and expectations, organisational practices, and communication as core dimensions. Validation data show that OHBC relates to other climate dimensions such as employees welfare and safety climate, but is distinct from these other dimensions. OBHC is positively related to health behaviour and negatively correlated with employees’ body mass index (BMI).

I shall present data from a daily-survey study and a longitudinal study that shed more light on how OHBC might trigger healthy eating. For instance, findings from the daily-survey study show that OHBC predicts snacking fresh fruit at work (as opposed to snacking sweets) by activating "health" as food-choice motive. In addition, this study showed that high self-control demands at work may undermine healthy eating by activation "affect regulation" as food-choice motive. As a whole these data demonstrate that organisational climate may help employees to stick to a healthy diet and to engage in physical exercise. I shall discuss practical implications and shall address avenues for future research.

Bio:

Sabine Sonnentag is a full professor of Work and Organizational Psychology at the University of Mannheim, Germany. Her research addresses the question of how individuals can stay healthy, energetic, and productive on the job. She studies job stress and job-stress recovery, health behavior (eating, physical exercise), proactive behavior, and self-regulation. Dr. Sonnentag’s work has been published in leading journals of the field, including the Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology. She is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology, the Journal of Organizational Behavior, and the Journal of Business and Psychology; in addition she serves on the editorial boards of numerous journals, including the Academy of Management Journal, Personnel Psychology, and the Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior. She is a fellow of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) and an elected member of the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. She holds a doctoral degree (Dr. rer. nat.) from the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany.

Speaker: Neil Conway

Title: The enacting and thwarting of occupational calling and its implications for leadership, motivation, and well-being

Abstract:

Research on occupational calling is an emerging field. Researchers have considered links between callings and occupational fit, career and life satisfaction, and calling has been examined across a wide range of occupational groups and job types, such as medics, artists, college presidents, and leaders. It is generally assume that calling contributes to well-being and life satisfaction as people with a calling pursue goals that they find deeply meaningful.  Nonetheless, how and why calling relates to well-being is acknowledged as under-researched and complex as enacting a calling may require people to make considerable sacrifices and therefore detract from well-being. Some calling behaviours may reflect intrinsic interests, whereas others are the result of fulfilling an unbending duty. In the presentation I introduce calling and consider its motivational and wellbeing implications. I draw on self-determination theory – a theory that makes distinctions between different types of motivation – to understand how enacting a calling relates both positively and negatively to daily well-being. I present findings from a daily diary method novel to the calling field and a sample with a distinctive calling, Church of England clergy. The context to the study was a concern that clergy callings were being thwarted due to the ever increasing intrusion of administrative and so-called leadership activities, familiar no doubt to many academics.

Bio:

Neil Conway is a Professor in Organizational Behaviour at the School of Management, Royal Holloway, University of London. His main research interests include psychological approaches to understanding the employment relationship, work motivation and performance, occupational identity, and the psychological contract. Current projects include investigating the role of calling and its implications for motivation and well-being, the effects of UK Government austerity measures on public sector psychological contracts, and examining the reciprocal links between driving commutes and daily work experiences. Neil is currently a visiting lecturer at the University of Toulouse, France, Paris Dauphine University, France.

Speaker: Sandra Robinson

Title: Ostracism and Social Exclusion at Work

Abstract:

This talk addresses past, present and future empirical studies of mine addressing ostracism and social exclusion at work. Using a range of methodological approaches, from organizational surveys to lab experiments, these studies try to answer a number of questions: What does ostracism at work look like and how frequent is it? What are the effects of feeling left out, snubbed, ignored or avoided at work? How impactful is ostracism, in comparison to other forms of workplace mistreatment? How do employees make meaning of being ostracized and what are the implications of those meanings? And are there differences between being ostracized from task interactions and being excluded from purely social interactions at work?

Bio:

Sandra Robinson (PhD Northwestern) is a Professor and Distinguished University Scholar in the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia, where she has served as chair of the tenure and promotion committee and is the upcoming Director of the PhD Program.

Sandra is known for her research on the 'darkside' of organization behavior, and has had a keen interest in introducing and developing new focal areas of study under this umbrella. Her work has been some of the earliest in the areas of psychological contract breach and trust betrayal, workplace deviance, territorial behavior and workplace ostracism. She has published in a wide range of well regarded journals, such as Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Administrative Science Quarterly and Journal of Applied Psychology, and her work has been covered in numerous popular press outlets, such as the Wall Street Journal, the Economist and CNN.

Sandra has earned numerous awards for her research record, such as the Ascendant Scholar of the Western Academy of Management, the JMI Distinguished Scholar, and the Cummings Award from the OB Division of the AoM. She has also earned awards for reviewing, such as from Academy of Management Journal and Academy of Management Discoveries, along with various awards for service. On service, Sandra has held a number of elected professional roles, including Rep-at-Large for the Western Academy, Rep-at-large for the OB Division, of AoM, in addition to serving five years on the Chair Track of the OB Division of AOM, starting with the role of Program Chair and ending with the role of Division Chair.

Speaker: Rob Briner, PhD

Topic: Understanding barriers to evidence-based practice in management: the roles of organizations and consultants (a bit) and universities and academics (a bit more)

Abstract: 

Concerns about the ‘gap’ between management research produced in business schools and management practice are long-standing and well-documented.  Management practices do not seem often to be based much on research evidence and the research produced by management researchers seems to be of limited interest to managers.  Many approaches to solving this problem have been proposed including, most recently, evidence-based management. Evidence-based practice has been adopted by many professions and is a way of making better-informed decisions that enhance the effectiveness of practitioners.  I will argue that academic practices around both research and teaching act as a barrier to the further development of evidence-based practice in management.  Such practices include poor methods, focusing on publishing as the goal of science, and using student satisfaction as a proxy for teaching quality and learning.  I will then consider what business schools can do to more actively promote evidence-based management and teach and train students in ways that are more likely to help them become evidence-based managers.

Bio: 

Rob is Professor of Organizational Psychology at Queen Mary, University of London and also Scientific Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Management (www.cebma.org).  His research has focused on several topics including well-being, emotions, stress, ethnicity, the psychological contract, absence from work, motivation, work-nonwork and everyday work behaviour.  Beyond academic research, Rob helps practitioners and organizations make better use of evidence, including research evidence, in decision-making as well as encouraging academics to make research more accessible.  He has written for and presented to practitioners on many aspects of HR and organizational psychology and is now involved in many initiatives aimed at developing and promoting evidence-based practice. He has received several awards for his work in this area including the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology Academic Contribution to Practice Award in 2014 and topped HR Magazine’s Most Influential Thinker list in 2016.

Speaker: Jennifer Berdahl

Title: Harassment and Contest Culture in Organizations

Abstract:

The #MeToo movement has highlighted the ubiquity of sexual harassment, as well as its costs -- to its targets, and increasingly, to its perpetrators and the organizations that tolerate them. This talk presents two decades of research into sex-based harassment that reveals its systemic patterns, forms, and the organizational cultures in which it thrives.

Bio:

Jennifer L. Berdahl (PhD, University of Illinois) is the Professor of Leadership Studies: Gender and Diversity, at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on the social psychology of gender and power at work, with a focus on sexual harassment. Berdahl regularly appears in the media to discuss her research and contemporary gender issues at work and serves as an expert witness on individual and class action sex discrimination cases in the U.S. and Canada.

Speaker: Jose Cortina

Topic: Don’t feel restricted with restricted variance interactions

Abstract:

Although interaction hypotheses are increasingly common in our field, many recent papers have pointed out that authors often have difficulty justifying interaction hypotheses.  The purpose of this talk is to describe a particular type of interaction, the restricted variance (RV) interaction.  The essence of the RV interaction is that, as the value of one variable in a system changes, certain values of another variable in the system become less plausible, thus restricting its variance. This, in turn, influences relationships between that variable and other variables. I will explain and illustrate the forms that RV interactions can take and the implications, often counterintuitive, of many of the forms.  I also describe how one should go about testing them. 

Bio:

Jose M. Cortina is a Professor in the Department of Management and Entrepreneurship at (you guessed it) Virginia Commonwealth University.  He received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 1994.  He is best known for his papers and books on research methods, although he has dabbled in many different areas including, most recently, the effects of music characteristics on workplace outcomes.  Dr. Cortina is a former Editor of Organizational Research Methods (ORM) and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology.  He was honored by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) with the 2001 Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award and the 2011 Distinguished Teaching Award.  He was also honored by the Research Methods Division of The Academy of Management with the 2004 Best Paper Award and by the ORM Editorial Board with the 2012 and 2017 Best Paper Awards.  Dr. Cortina served as President of SIOP from 2014-2015.  Back when he had spare time, his hobby was competitive bridge.

2017

Speaker: Paul Bliese

Topic: Randomized Trials, Events, and Emergence: Exploring variants of Longitudinal Models

Abstract:

Longitudinal data are common in organizational behavior and numerous variants of longitudinal models are available for refining and advancing theory. This talk focuses on the analysis of longitudinal data starting with alternative methods for the common two-wave randomized trial (Bodner & Bliese, R&R). Building off the simple design, the talk extends to growth models and discontinuous growth models as a way to understand transitions and events (Bliese & Lang, 2016; Bliese, Adler, & Flynn, 2017).  Finally, the talk concludes with a variant of models useful for detecting changes in residual patterns consistent with the emergence of consensus (Lang, Bliese, & de Voogt, under review; Lang & Bliese, forthcoming).  For instance, the models can test whether members of a group show increased similarity in ratings of affect over time, and the models can test whether certain group members such as leaders are differentially responsible for driving uniformity in affect over time.

Bio: 

Dr. Paul D. Bliese received a Ph.D. from Texas Tech University and a B.A. from Texas Lutheran University. In 1992, he joined the US Army where he spent 22 years as a research psychologist at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR).  In 2009, he formed the Center for Military Psychiatry and Neuroscience at WRAIR, and served as the Director until he retired at the rank of Colonel in 2014. Over his military career, Dr. Bliese directed a large portfolio of research initiatives examining stress, leadership, well-being, and performance.  In this capacity, from 2007 to 2014 he oversaw the US Army’s Mental Health Advisory Team program assessing the morale and well-being of Soldiers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.  Throughout his professional career, Dr. Bliese has led efforts to advance statistical methods and apply analytics to complex organizational data.  He developed the multilevel package for the open-source statistical programming language R, and was instrumental in funding the development of the lme4 package.  His research has been influential in advancing organizational multilevel theory, and has had a demonstrable impact on health and Human Resource policy decisions within the US Army and the Department of Defense. Currently, Dr. Bliese is an associate professor in the Management Department of the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina.  He also serves as an associated editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology.

Speaker: Ramona Bobocel

Topic:Forgiving interpersonal wrongs: The role of psychological distance and construal level

Abstract:

Interpersonal forgiveness has been associated with a number of benefits for the victim, such as greater mental health and psychological well-being, as well as for the victim-offender relationship. The benefits associated with forgiveness have motivated scholars to investigate a number of personality and contextual predictors of forgiveness. More recently, researchers have begun to investigate cognitive factors that might promote forgiveness. In our laboratory, we have been extending this line of inquiry by examining the role of psychological distance and construal level on interpersonal forgiveness. In the present talk, I will review our findings and discuss current directions. Our research has implications for understanding cognitive processes underlying forgiveness, and it suggests a novel approach to facilitating forgiveness.

Bio:

Ramona Bobocel received her PhD from Western University in 1992, and is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Waterloo. Her research focuses on social and organizational justice, with a continuing interest in understanding how people form judgments of fairness and how they cope with unfair treatment. Recent work has included the study of forgiveness as a prosocial response to interpersonal wrongs. Dr. Bobocel’s research has appeared in top-tier scientific journals, such as the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Management. She has received several awards in recognition of her scientific contributions, including the Ontario Premier’s Research Excellence Award, and is Fellow of the Canadian Psychological and the Association for Psychological Sciences. Dr. Bobocel has served as Associate Editor for the flagship journal of the International Society for Justice Research, and as Consulting Editor for several journals, including Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Management, European Journal of Social Psychology, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. She has also served as Past President of the Canadian Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

Speaker: Lukas Neville

Topic: To Err Is Human, To Forgive is… Trustworthy? Effects of Victim Forgiveness on Observer Trust

Abstract:

Research on the effects of interpersonal forgiveness usually focuses on the transgressor-victim dyad.  But victims' forgiveness for mistreatment or transgressions may also influence their relationships with third-party observers in the workplace -- the victim's peers and coworkers.  Drawing on theory of forgiveness as a signal of self-control (Burnette, Davisson, Finkel, Van Tongeren, Hui & Hoyle, 2013; Righetti & Finkhanuer, 2011), I argue that observers will be more likely to trust forgiving victims than victims who hold a grudge. 

A vignette experiment (n=80) comparing forgiveness and grudge demonstrates that forgiving victims are more trusted by observers, both in terms of disclosure-based trust and reliance-based trust.  In a second recall-based study (n=197), I show that the effect of forgiveness on observers' trust in victims is conditional on the victim's choice to enact or forgo punishment.  Punitive-but-forgiving victims trigger victim-blaming, reducing the trust-building effect of forgiveness.

I discuss this finding in terms of a paradox it presents for victims of workplace transgressions.  Previous research shows that forgiveness can be enhanced by attempts to seek justice, and that forgiveness without some form of amends can have negative effects for victims.  But the conclusion we would draw from those prior results (punish, then forgive) is at odds with the finding of these two studies that forgiveness' positive effect on trust is attenuated by the choice to punish.  I conclude by discussing how restorative approaches to justice might help reconcile this tension.

Bio:

Lukas Neville is an assistant professor of organizational behaviour at the Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba.  He holds a Ph.D. from the Smith School of Business at Queen's University.  His research interests include trust and conflict management, and he teaches organizational behaviour and negotiation in Asper's undergraduate, MBA, and executive-education programs.

Speaker: Lilia Cortina

Topic: Gender Harassment: A Technology of Oppression in Organizations

Abstract:

When people hear the term sexual harassment, they typically think only about unwanted sexual pursuit. This term is misleading, however, because oftentimes “sexual” harassment has little if anything to do with sexuality - instead it’s about gender. This talk will highlight new findings on gender harassment: conduct that disparages employees of one gender but implies no sexual advance. I will present evidence on the pervasiveness of gender harassment, work environments associated with it, and its implications for worker wellbeing. I will argue that this harassment puts pressure on all employees (both women and men) to conform to a narrow standard of gender “appropriate” behavior. As a result, gender oppression is maintained in society and replicated on the job.

Bio:

Lilia M. Cortina is Professor of Psychology, Women’s Studies, and Management at the University of Michigan. She is also Associate Director of Michigan’s ADVANCE Program, which works to enhance faculty diversity, inclusion, retention, and leadership. Her research revolves around workplace victimization, with a particular focus on (1) harassment based on sex, sexuality, and gender, as well as (2) incivility on the job. In addition, she occasionally serves as an expert witness in forensic venues, for example testifying on sexual harassment and assault to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and the Department of Defense Judicial Proceedings Panel (commissioned by Congress to review military judicial procedures surrounding sexual assault). In recognition of unusual and outstanding contributions to the field, Professor Cortina has been named Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology.

Speaker: James Beck

Topic: A Formal Model of Adverse Workplace Outcomes: Counterintuitive Findings from the Lab and Field

Abstract:

Within most occupations it is important to maintain low levels of adverse outcomes, which are broadly defined as negative results contrary to an organization’s goals (e.g., defective products, damaged property, workplace injuries). To this end, individuals engage in preventative behaviours (e.g., inspecting products for defects, wearing protective gear) to limit adverse outcomes. However, preventative behaviours often come with costs. For instance, inspecting products takes time and slows productivity. Likewise, protective gear is often uncomfortable and cumbersome. As such, workers tend to keep these behaviours to a minimum when the likelihood of an adverse event is low, yet compensate for increases in the likelihood of an adverse event occurring by increasing preventative behaviours. Unfortunately, individuals are not particularly adept at making such behavioural adjustments, and instead tend to undercompensate. In the current research I seek to understand this problem by developing a formal (i.e., mathematical) model of adverse outcomes and preventative behaviours. The model’s results indicate that a sharp non-linear increase in preventative behaviour is needed to fully compensate for increased likelihood of an adverse outcome occurring. I argue that this pattern of behaviour may not be intuitive or obvious, and thus individuals may fail to fully compensate for an increased likelihood of an adverse event occurring due to a lack of understanding of this relationship. Data from three studies using various methodologies provide support for the model’s predictions. I will conclude the talk by discussing the implications of these results for self-regulatory theory, as well as the implications for designing interventions to limit adverse outcomes in the workplace.

Bio:

James Beck is an Associate Professor of industrial/organizational psychology at the University of Waterloo. He primarily studies the processes involved as individuals allocate time, effort, and attention toward multiple work goals. His work has been published in several top-tier outlets, including Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and Journal of Management.

Speaker: Winny Shen

Title: Flipping the script: Expanding our understanding of leadership behaviors by exploring leader outcomes and follower antecedents

Abstract: 

Although leadership has long been defined and recognized as a mutual social influence process between leaders and followers, leadership research has historically focused almost exclusively on certain directions of influence (e.g., the impact of leader behaviors on follower outcomes, the impact of leader personality on leadership behaviors). In this presentation, I explore relatively neglected areas and directions of influence between leaders and followers. Specifically, I examine the impact of follower performance on leader well-being as well as the relationship between follower personality and leadership behavior ratings. Implications for the expansion of leadership research are then discussed. 

Bio: 

Winny Shen is an Assistant Professor of Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Her research focuses on issues of diversity/inclusion, leadership, and occupational health psychology (i.e., work-family issues, understaffing, and worker health and well-being). Her research has has been published in leading psychology and management journals, including the Journal of Applied Psychology and Academy of Management Journal. Recently, the Association for Psychological Science recognized the contribution and potential of this body of work by designating Dr. Shen as a 2016 Rising Star in Psychological Science. 

2016

Speaker: Sandeep Mishra

Topic: Inequality, health, and risk-sensitive decision-making

Abstract: 

Substantial epidemiological evidence has shown that higher levels of income inequality are associated with poorer societal outcomes, including lower social capital, lower trust, greater crime and risk-taking, and worse mental and physical health. However, surprisingly little research has examined individual-level (vs. societal-level) consequences of inequality. Using the theoretical framework of risk-sensitivity theory, I present experimental and survey evidence linking individual-level inequality and relative deprivation (a downstream emotional consequence of inequality) with various decision-making and health-related outcomes, including behavioral risk-taking and gambling. In particular, I highlight some counterintuitive, but predicted findings indicating that chronically risk-persistent individuals (e.g., problem gamblers, convicts, drug addicts) are actually "rational" risk-sensitive decision-makers. Finally, I summarize some future lines of research that will further examine attitudes toward, and consequences of, inequality and relative deprivation. Together, this research demonstrates how understanding the risk-sensitive processes underlying decision-making has wide-ranging implications for individuals and society more generally.

Bio:           

Sandeep Mishra is Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Faculty of Business Administration at the University of Regina. Prior to this position, he was a postdoctoral research fellow in Industrial/Organizational psychology at the University of Guelph, externally funded by NSERC and the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre. Sandeep received his Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees in psychology from the University of Lethbridge, and his B.Sc. in psychology from McMaster University. Sandeep’s research interests are broadly in the areas of judgment and decision-making, behavioral economics, personality and individual differences, health and well-being, and evolutionary theory. He has over 30 publications in diverse fields, including social psychology, personality psychology, and health.

Speaker: Jose Cortina

Topic: On the cutting edge or falling over the side?  Rethinking the way that we evaluate research.

Abstract:

There is an increasing disconnect between best and actual research practices. Hypotheses are unjustified, research designs are inappropriate, results are not replicated, and analyses are misapplied. The first purpose of this talk is to describe some of these problems and present evidence that they exist. The second is to identify the reasons that they exist. Having identified these reasons, the third purpose of this talk is to discuss how to replace these reasons with reasons that would lead to a true Organizational Science.

Bio:

Jose M. Cortina is a Professor in the I/O Psychology program at George Mason University.  He is past Editor of Organizational Research Methods and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology.  Dr. Cortina was honored by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology with the 2001 Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award, by the Research Methods Division of AOM with the 2004 Best Paper Award and by the ORM Editorial Board with the 2012 Best Paper Award.  He was honored by GMU with a 2010 Teaching Excellence Award and by SIOP with the 2011 Distinguished Teaching Award.  Dr. Cortina currently serves as Past President of SIOP.

Speaker: Christopher Berry

Topic: Revisiting the Hispanic-White Mean Difference on Job Performance

Abstract:

Job performance is most commonly measured via supervisor ratings and is associated with various positive outcomes for employees and organizations. However, a substantial mean difference between racial/ethnic subgroups on job performance could have significant negative implications, ranging from concerns over possible bias in subjective supervisor ratings to legal action. Although much research has addressed mean job performance differences between Black and White employees, very little has addressed this issue for Hispanic and White employees, despite Hispanic persons facing many of the same societal challenges as Black persons (e.g., discrimination, SES) and despite Hispanic persons representing one of the largest and/or fastest-growing racial/ethnic subgroups in the USA and Canada. The present meta-analysis revisited the Hispanic-White mean difference on job performance, including approximately 17 times more samples than a smaller, previous meta-analysis. Although the smaller, previous meta-analysis found essentially no mean Hispanic-White job performance difference, the present meta-analysis found sizable mean differences in favor of White employees on supervisor ratings; there was no significant Hispanic-White mean difference for objective measures of job performance. The results have negative implications for Hispanic employees and highlight the need for research investigating why this mean difference on supervisor ratings exists.

Bio:

Chris Berry is an Associate Professor in the Organizational Behavior and Human Resources Department at Indiana University Kelly School of Business. He received his PhD from University of Minnesota in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. He is an associate editor for Journal of Applied Psychology. He has won numerous awards including Distinguished Early Career Contributions –Science Award, Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (2015).

Speaker: Sharon Toker

Topic: Should we be stressed about stress?

Abstract:

The scientific debate over the conceptualization of stress has been ongoing since the 1950s'. Still, stress is a leading cause for suffering, with one in four Europeans reporting being stressed at work. Thus, critical questions that researchers should ask themselves are: What do people mean when they say they are "stressed"? Can we measure stress? Can we study stress? Is 'stress' indeed harmful? The pursuit of answers to these questions is important and timely, as 'stress' is portrayed as the 'number 1 killer'. In an attempt to answer some of these questions, my presentation will include two main parts. First, I'll review different conceptualizations of stress and discuss them using multiple points of view (psychological, sociological and physiological). I will claim that the use of the word "stress" in research is somewhat problematic. Second, I'll review various findings (published and unpublished) from a large scale cohort study I have initiated in 2003 (n=19,500). In this study, the associations between stressors (e.g., workload, fear of terror), resources (e.g., control, support), affective states (e.g., vigor, burnout, depression) and health (e.g., CVD, diabetes), have been the focal point of interest. 

Bio:

Professor Sharon Toker (Ph.D., Tel Aviv University), after completing her post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford University, joined the Faculty of Management at Tel Aviv University. She has served as the head of the organizational behavior department and as the academic head of the organizational consulting program.  In 2013, Prof. Toker won the Early Career Achievement Award, given by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH).

Prof. Toker is a dedicated researcher in the field of organizational behavior and occupational health, with experience in large-scale field studies and quantitative and qualitative methods. Her academically diverse background (Psychology, Sociology, Organizational Behavior, Coaching and Health Promotion) complements a high motivation to engage in interdisciplinary research approaches and concepts. Prof. Toker is the author of 33 papers, integrating psychological and medical issues. She has published in leading academic journals, such as Psychological Bulletin, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. Her interests include: Stress theory; The influence of work characteristics on employees' mental and physical health; Health promotion in organizations; Employees' well-being, burnout, and health; Organizational cynicism. https://en-recanati.tau.ac.il/profile/tokersha

Speaker: Eric Surface

Topic: Trainer Management and Development by the Numbers: Using Data to Improve Instruction and Learning

Abstract: 

Organizations rely on workplace learning as an important strategy to ensure individuals and teams have the capabilities needed to perform work activities, achieve outcomes and accomplish organizational objectives. Individuals rely on workplace learning to develop capabilities needed on their current job or to remain competitive in the labor market. Formal instructor-led training is still a key component of workplace learning. Although the efficacy of such training is often assumed, training effectiveness can vary greatly across learners, instructors, courses, events and programs. Opportunities exist to improve the effectiveness of learning, instruction and learning transfer.

In our practice, at ALPS Solutions, we have identified several leverage points or key factors in the learning process by approaching training effectiveness from the perspective of integrating existing training research and practice with formative, multilevel, interactionist and dynamic perspectives learning and measurement. One key training effectiveness factor is the trainer or instructor. My talk focuses on our research and practice related to using formative evaluation in combination with learner assessment and other data to improve instructor effectiveness and, therefore, learning and training program effectiveness.

The main focus of the talk will be on instructor performance and effectiveness, how it is defined and measured, and how it can be improved using evidence-based feedback and development interventions. The presentation will cover the following:

  • Background, including models that guide our work
  • Instructor performance verse instructor effectiveness and whether learner scores are (or can be used as) measures of instructor performance or effectiveness
  • Example of the impact of instructors on learner outcomes and how this led to our focus on instructor performance and effectiveness and a web-based feedback intervention
  • Overview of our research supporting the intervention approach—including the development and validation of measures
  • Example of how our research and interventions have become tools used for instructional improvement and instructor management and development
  • Future directions for research and practice, including implications for other fields, such as education

Bio: 

Dr. Eric A. Surface is the president and principal scientist of ALPS Solutions, where he advocates for the use of evidence-based practices and the ALPS model (analyze, learn, perform and succeed) to help clients accomplish their objectives. ALPS focuses on research- and evidence-based solutions in the areas of learning and performance. ALPS does projects in needs assessment, evaluation, assessment, learning design/delivery and performance management. Eric has led numerous applied research and consulting engagements in military/government, corporate and non-profit organizations since 1997. Currently, he is leading the development of a software product, based on ALPS research and interventions, to improve training effectiveness for clients.

Eric believes strongly in the scientist-practitioner model and has presented at numerous conferences, such as SIOP and Academy of Management, and published in peer-reviewed journals, such as Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Military Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Human Performance, Organizational Research Methods, Foreign Language Annals, and Journal of Managerial Psychology.

Eric is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Society for Military Psychology (Division 19, APA). He is currently the Secretary of the Society for Military Psychology (2014-2016). He earned his PhD in I/O Psychology at North Carolina State University and was an Army Research Institute Consortium Research Fellow and Post-Doctoral Fellow.

Speaker: Tom Lawrence

Topic: High stakes Institutional Translation:  Establishing North America’s First Government-Sanctioned Supervised Injection Site

Abstract:

Around the world, potentially effective responses to serious social problems are left untried because those responses are politically, culturally or morally problematic in affected communities. I describe the process through which communities import such practices as “high-stakes institutional translation”. Drawing on a study of North America’s first supervised injection site for users of illegal drugs, I propose a process model of high-stakes institutional translation that involves a triggering period of public expressions of intense emotion, followed by waves of translations in which the controversial practice is constructed in discursive and material terms many times over.

Bio: 

Tom is a Professor of Strategy at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, UK. His areas of expertise include strategic management, organizational change, social innovation, institutional theory, and social change. This work has appeared in the leading organization and strategy journals, including Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, Organization Studies, Journal of Management Studies, Human Relations, and Journal of Management. He is also a co-editor of the Sage Handbook of Organization Studies and the Sage Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism. Before joining Saïd Business School, Tom was the W. J. VanDusen Professor of Management at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, and has held permanent or visiting positions at the University of Victoria, University of British Columbia, Cambridge University, McGill University, St. Andrews University, and Chulalongkorn University. He received his PhD in organisational analysis and BComm in finance from the University of Alberta.

2015

Speakers: Peter Hom, Tom Lee, Terence Mitchell, and Rodger Griffeth

Topic: Empirical Tests of Proximal Withdrawal States Theory (PWST)

Abstract: 

In a variety of samples, funded in part by the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM), we will present the first major findings of recent conceptual developments of employee turnover (Hom, Mitchell, Lee & Griffeth, 2012; Griffeth, Lee, Mitchell & Hom, 2012) called Proximal Withdrawal States Theory (PWST). Grounded in reviews of past theory and empirical research of stayers and leavers, PWST develops a model of four groups of employees based on their preferences and control over leaving and staying.  We labeled these groups enthusiastic stayers and leavers, and reluctant stayers and leavers. The presentation will describe the creation, development, and validation of measures of these states, and substantive tests of differences and similarities among the four groups.

Bios:

Peter Hom is a Professor at the Department of Management Arizona State University. Peter has published over 40 journal articles and published 3 books. He is currently on the editorial board of JOM and JAP and was on the editorial board of AMJ for over a decade.

Tom Lee is the Hughes M. Blake Professor of Management and Associate Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs at the Foster School of Business, University of Washington. Tom has published over 85 academic articles and 1 book, and received numerous research awards. Tom served as Editor of the Academy of Management Journal, as President of the Academy of Management and on eight editorial boards. 

Terence Mitchel is Edward Carlson Professor of Business Administration and Professor of Psychology at University of Washington. Terence has published over 169 articles and 9 books.

 Rodger Griffeth is the Byham Chair of I-O Psychology and Professor of Psychology at Ohio University. Rodger has published over 115 journal articles and has published 3 books. Rodger is the Editor of both Human Resource Management Review and Research in Human Resource Management and on the editorial board of a number of other journals.

Speaker: Ken Brown

Topic: Unfreezing change as three steps: Rethinking Kurt Lewin’s legacy for change management

Abstract: 

Kurt Lewin’s ‘changing as three steps’ (unfreezingàchangingàrefreezing) is regarded by many as the classic or fundamental approach to managing change. Lewin has been criticized by scholars for over-simplifying the change process and has been defended by others against such charges.  However, what has remained unquestioned is the model’s foundational significance. It is sometimes traced (if it is traced at all) to the first article ever published in Human Relations. Based on a comparison of what Lewin wrote about changing as three steps with how this is presented in later works, we argue that he never developed such a model and it took form after his death. We investigate how and why ‘changing as three steps’ came to be understood as the foundation of the fledgling subfield of change management and to influence change theory and practice to this day, and how questioning this supposed foundation can encourage innovation. 

Bio:           

Dr. Ken Brown, Associate Dean, Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Ken is a top training and development researcher, having published over 15 journal articles in ABS 4/FT45, and is the Former Editor of Academy of Management Learning and Education.

Speaker: Julian Barling

Topic: The Science of Leadership

Bio: Julian Barling is the Borden Chair of Leadership at Queen's University. .His research examines transformational leadership and employee well-being, including how leaders can create safe and healthy work environments. He has authored over 150 research articles and chapters, and is the recent author of the book "The Science of Leadership: Lessons from Research for Organizational Leaders."